Sunday, November 26, 2006

Journalism icon dies in two cities

As I blogged about discounted funeral services on 23 November 006, I could not know that somebody well known in the Philippines would die the next day. Max Soliven passed away on 24 November.

Max Soliven was one of the most influential columnists in the Philippines. He wrote Gloria's father Diosdado Macapagal into the presidency in 1961. He was arrested in 1972 after Ferdinand Marcos promulgated martial law. Released after a couple of months, he later co-founded (according to some sources) the Philippine Daily Inquirer, which immediately became a prominent voice in the fight against the Marcos dictatorship in the Philippines. He also co-founded the Philippine Star from where the above photo was taken.

Let’s ask a basic journalistic question: Where did Max Soliven die?

Philippine’s most influential newspaper, the Inquirer (print version) from 25 November 2006, provides the answer:

“…. In a sense, his death in Tokyo yesterday was in keeping with his character: He died in harness, still at work gathering material for the lengthy and influential columns he wrote with such ease and undiminished grace. And he dies abroad, a true citizen of the world.” (page A12)

“Philippine journalism lost a major pillar yesterday when Star publisher and columnist Max Soliven passed away in Osaka from double pneumonia…..” (page A13)

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9 Comments:

At November 26, 2006 at 2:46 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

How are the worst newspapers in the Philippines then?

 
At November 26, 2006 at 9:17 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

freddy, he only said that the inquirer is the most influential newspaper, not the best. read philstar instead. based on their website, tokyo was where he died, osaka was where he gave a speech.

i consider philstar as better than inquirer, and soliven has a lot to do with that. i wonder how they would go on without him...

 
At November 26, 2006 at 10:54 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

D, I think you missed the point.

 
At November 27, 2006 at 11:17 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I am sure Max would have enjoyed a rival newspaper making a blunder like that. Who knows, perhaps the ghost of Max Soliven somehow squeezed his way into a sloppy journalist's keyboard (on his way from Tokyo or Osaka or somewhere inbetween)...

 
At November 27, 2006 at 9:39 PM, Blogger Sidney said...

I have mixed feelings about Max. For sure a great journalist but alas with a huge ego and not always very objective.

 
At November 29, 2006 at 2:56 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Sidney - If you dont have a huge ego in any high profile position, you might as well be home blogging the way you are now. Do you know Max as well as I do?

 
At November 29, 2006 at 9:49 AM, Blogger brommel said...

If you remain 'anonym' the answer is clear to me.

 
At December 7, 2006 at 11:14 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Max Soliven trod the established path from courageous maverick to friend of the establishment, without ever apparently having the self-knowledge to realise he had become a parody of his former self.

It's sad that he died relatively young, but the only thing in the end that distinguished him from all the other blowhards in the print media was the kilometric length of his columns, his overblown sense of his own importance and that wife of his.

 
At February 15, 2010 at 7:04 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

After reading you blog, Your blog is very useful for me .I bookmarked your blog!
Wishes your valentine day to be joyful!

 

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